Daily Links Mar 27

As my apple-cheeked mater was wont to repeat “there’s nothing new under the sun”. Floods, and towns under threat from floods, are not ‘unprecedented’, what we do about them also has precedents. Gundagai was relocated to higher ground 170 years ago, Grantham saw much retreating to higher ground just 11years ago. Bonnie Don and Adaminaby were relocated after being purposefully flooded as a result of dam-building. Don’t build on flood-plains is the long-term answer.

Post of the Day

Road traffic in European cities exposes 60 million people to noise levels harmful to health

A study assessed the levels of noise generated by road traffic and examined its impact on health in 749 European cities. The findings show that nearly 60 million adults are subjected to unhealthy levels of vehicle-generated noise. Compliance with the World Health Organization (WHO) noise-level guidelines could prevent 3,600 deaths annually from ischemic heart disease alone.

 

On This Day

March 27

Mothering Sunday – Christianity

 

Climate Change

Ice shelf the size of New York City collapses in previously stable East Antarctica

Temperatures in the region normally sit around minus 51 degrees at this time of year, but earlier this month, they were around 10 degrees.

 

Researchers investigate development of coastal peatland in Indonesia over thousands of years

Tropical peatlands are one of the most efficient carbon sinks. The flipside is that they can become massive emitters of carbon if they are damaged, for instance by land use change, degradation or fire.

 

Warming oceans are getting louder

Climate change is speeding sound transmission in the oceans and the way it varies over the globe with physical properties of the oceans.

 

National

How much should farmers be paid to host wind turbines used to make green hydrogen?

Wind turbines have proven a windfall for farmers, who are paid fees by electricity generators to put the infrastructure on their land. But will the deals be as good for landowners embarking on lease agreements with those in the hydrogen industry? 

 

Damned if they do, damned if they don’t: Are dams good or bad?

Building dams is popular with farmers and voters, but others are not convinced they are a water security solution in the long term.

 

George taught himself how to build an electric bike, car and yacht. He says anyone can do it

Meet the Albany man who is installing an electric motor in his four-wheel-drive. He’s already made an electric bike for his girlfriend and is converting his dad’s yacht to electric power.

 

Albanese: Fighting climate change is key to hobbling China’s push into the Pacific

Labor leader Anthony Albanese says increasing foreign aid and addressing climate change are crucial to maintaining stability in the Pacific after Solomon Islands signed a security pact with China.

 

Honey trap: is there a downside to the boom in beekeeping?

Backyard hives have taken off in Australia. But have we got enough habitat, and what does the boom in honeybees mean for native bees?

 

In the danger zone: Moving out of a flood-prone area can be harder than it sounds

As NSW and Queensland count the cost of another deadly flooding disaster, thousands of residents are facing an agonising decision — to rebuild or relocate? And many are wondering whether the billions spent on clean-up might be better off helping them move to safer ground.

 

Climate alarmism has turned kids into snowflakes [$]

Piers Akerman

So-called climate change activism is morphing Australia’s children and Millennials into an ill-informed and unintelligent group.

 

Poll reveals support for climate action but no consensus on 2030 targets

Hayden O’Connor

Last week, the Australian Conservation Foundation released the results of their latest ‘Australia’s biggest climate poll’.

 

Victoria

‘Burn it or bury it’: Where will all the rubbish go when the tips fill up?

In just five years’ time, there will be no space in landfill across Melbourne’s sprawling south-east, and a proposed alternative waste plan is dividing councils.

 

New South Wales

‘Direct action’ climate activist arrested on fifth day of rolling anti-coal protests

Climate activists have struck for the fifth day in a row outside a Sydney shipping terminal used to transport coal.

 

‘Dopey’ climate protesters let out on bail

Despite a plea from Transport Minister David Elliott to ‘throw the book at them’, a magistrate has granted bail to two Blockade Australia protesters.

 

ACT

Canberra Beam and Neuron e-scooter use powers ahead

The bright orange or purple electric scooters dotted throughout the city make up part of the scenery for many commuters across the ACT. However, recent research has shown more people are leaving the car at home, pocketing their MyWay card and scooting to work.

 

Plan to save Canberra’s mature native trees after rapid decline [$]

Better protection will be provided to some of Canberra’s oldest residents, following a staggering decline in mature native trees largely due to land clearing.

 

Queensland

‘They brought their politics with them’: will Queensland’s newest residents affect the election?

The state’s population grew by more than 57,800 in 12 months, mostly from southern migration

 

Sold out: why Australia doesn’t have enough electric vehicles to go around

Waiting lists of thousands, cars selling out in seconds, welcome to the frustrating world of the Australian EV buyer

 

Many Queenslanders will be feeling ‘spent’ as they cast their votes in the federal election

Matt Eaton

Floods were once just called acts of God, but many more Queenslanders might be viewing them as a human failure to act on climate change when it comes time to vote in the federal election

 

Western Australia

‘Judge me on my actions’: can Andrew Forrest become Australia’s clean, green hero?

The billionaire mining magnate known as Twiggy may be emulating Bill Gates with the scale of his philanthropy, but not everyone is convinced

Hail hits WA as weather takes turn for the worse

 Ex-tropical cyclone Charlotte has brought wild weather to Western Australia, with parts of the Wheatbelt experiencing hail storms amid a severe weather warning.

 

Sustainability

‘It’s exhausting’: Why we doomscroll, and how we can stop

It’s easier to access news and information than ever before, but the overwhelm of information can also lead to doomscrolling. So why do we doomscroll in the first place? And what, if anything, can we do to stop?

 

New type of ultraviolet light makes indoor air as safe as outdoors

Using far-UVC light in places where people gather indoors could help prevent the next pandemic

 

Breaking down plastic into its constituent parts

A team of ETH researchers led by Athina Anastasaki have succeeded in breaking down plastic into its molecular building blocks and in recovering over 90 percent of them. A first step towards genuine plastic recycling.

 

Road traffic in European cities exposes 60 million people to noise levels harmful to health

A study assessed the levels of noise generated by road traffic and examined its impact on health in 749 European cities. The findings show that nearly 60 million adults are subjected to unhealthy levels of vehicle-generated noise. Compliance with the World Health Organization (WHO) noise-level guidelines could prevent 3,600 deaths annually from ischemic heart disease alone.

 

Environment: Pollution destroys lives, the ozone layer and bushland

Peter Sainsbury

Profits trump health in sacrifice zones, and pollution from the 2019/20 bushfires may increase Australia’s skin cancer rate. Dogs destroying bushland.

 

Nature Conservation

Advances in street lighting are reducing the efficacy of coastal species’ camouflage

A study has shown species that rely on darkness to forage and feed are losing the gift of camouflage thanks to advances in the lighting used to illuminate the world’s cities and coastlines.

 

Birds are laying their eggs a month earlier, and climate change is to blame

Hundred-year-old museum collections help show that birds are nesting earlier in the spring

 

Remote Indian Ocean reefs bounce back quickly after bleaching

Coral reefs in remote or protected areas can recover quickly after mass coral bleaching events, new research shows.

 

Indian forest loss ‘worse than feared’ due to climate change

Forest loss from temperature and rainfall alterations adding to deforestation issue



Maelor Himbury
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